Delighted to be on the #BlogTour today for #TheSevenDoors by Agnes Ravatn @OrendaBooks #NordicNoir #readers #bookreview #newbook

‘Unfolds in an austere style that perfectly captures the bleakly beautiful landscape of Norway’s far
north’
Irish Times

University professor Nina is at a turning point. Her work seems increasingly irrelevant, her doctor husband is never home, relations with her adult daughter Ingeborg are strained, and their beautiful house is scheduled for demolition.
When Ingeborg decides to move into another house they own, things take a very dark turn. The young woman who rents it disappears, leaving behind her son, the day after Nina and Ingeborg pay her a visit.
With few clues, the police enquiry soon grinds to a halt, but Nina has an inexplicable sense of guilt. Unable to rest, she begins her own investigation, but as she pulls on the threads of the case, it seems her discoveries may have very grave consequences for her and her family.

My thoughts…

This was one of those books that once you start reading, you keep going until the end, despite the late hour. It’s not action packed or fast paced, it’s a very steady read, but completely absorbing. I have to admit there were some inferences that starting raising my curiosity fairly early on, and the ending proved that my ‘spidery’ senses were correct, so the outcome was not a surprise for me, but I loved watching the interactions of all the characters throughout: the network of lies, suspicions, greed, power-play, and manipulation provides great reading.

This is a layered psychological thriller with plenty of underlying drama. At the core is Nina, who is being displaced from her roots, and having to relocate as her house is going to be demolished. I really enjoyed her character, in particular her tenacity and drive to not give in. With themes of connection, roots and uprooting wrapped around the central mystery, there’s certainly a decent amount of background and depth to the narrative.

I loved the references to art, literature, and fairy-tales. The Bluebeard underscore was woven darkly and beautifully; the threaded allusion addition was very welcome, and I really enjoyed the insights it offers for readers, with the seven doors parallel.

Overall, a dark, layered allusion themed Nordic Noir that hooks you in until the closing lines.

The Author – Agnes Ravatn

Agnes Ravatn

Agnes Ravatn (b. 1983) is a Norwegian author and columnist. She made her
literary début with the novel Week 53 (Veke 53) in 2007. Since then she
has written three critically acclaimed and award-winning essay collections:
Standing still (Stillstand), 2011, Popular Reading (Folkelesnad), 2011, and
Operation self-discipline (Operasjon sjøldisiplin), 2014. In these works,
Ravatn revealed a unique, witty voice and sharp eye for human fallibility.
Her second novel, The Bird Tribunal (Fugletribuanlet), was an international
bestseller translated into fifteen languages, winning an English PEN Award,
shortlisting for the Dublin Literary Award, a WHSmith Fresh Talent pick and a BBC Book at Bedtime. It was also made into a successful play, which premiered in Oslo in 2015. Agnes lives with her family in the Norwegian countryside.

Thanks to Anne for the tour invite and to Orenda Books for the review copy – wishing this book every success it deserves.

Please buy from independents if you can XX

An intriguing, magical fantasy debut #BlogTour #TheBoneShardDaughter by @AndreaGStewart with thanks to @orbitbooks @Tr4cyF3nt0n #readers #newbook #bookchat

It’s lovely to be chatting about THE BONE SHARD DAUGHTER today for the Blog Tour – many thanks to Tracy for the invite, and Orbit for the review copy. I enjoy reading fantasy, so this appealed to me straight away, and I wasn’t disappointed…

The Blurb…

The Sukai Dynasty has ruled the Phoenix Empire for over a century, their mastery of bone shard magic powering the monstrous constructs that maintain law and order. But now the emperor’s rule is failing, and revolution is sweeping across the Empire’s many islands.

Lin is the Emperor’s daughter, but a mysterious illness has stolen her childhood memories and her status as heir to the empire. Trapped in a palace of locked doors and old secrets, Lin vows to reclaim her birthright by mastering the forbidden art of bone shard magic.

But the mysteries behind such power are dark and deep, and wielding her family’s magic carries a great cost. When the revolution reaches the gates of the palace itself, Lin must decide how far she is willing to go to claim her throne – and save her people.

My thoughts…

THE BONE SHARD DAUGHTER is certainly an eye-catching book, and the title an intriguing one. I enjoy reading fantasy novels, so was delighted to read this one as part of its Blog Tour.

Firstly, I’m not usually a fan of too many narrative perspectives, in this book we see the story through several eyes, written either in the first or third person. Lin and Jovis are connected via their first-person narratives, and I personally enjoyed the immediacy and drive of these sections. I really liked both Lin and Jovis. Jovis in particular is very endearing as he copes with what life throws at him, but also the thought and dedication to maintain the search for his missing wife is very emotive; I loved the snatches of memory built into the story as we piece together the past. Ah, and then there’s the adorable evolving relationship with Mephi – a magical horned cat/otter type creature. Loved every moment with Mephi! I also enjoyed the third person narrative pulling into the story the lives of Ranami and Phalue that explores the relationship between two social classes and pulls in the revolution theme.

Overall, meticulous planning and structural format creates a multi-layered perspective fantasy set in a creative island-based world ruled by a failing Emperor. There’re all the elements fantasy readers expect, and importantly the world is carefully crafted in detail, so the transference from reality is seamless. This is a book of layers with a thought out embedded magical system – I found Pullman’s Dark Material vibes made creepy with the creature constructs lurking and spying. The idea is menacing, and Frankenstein vibes underscore the reanimated creatures. It’s really creative and explores more modern themes of experimentation and exploitation.

With themes of identity, control, loss, the past, memory, and connection this is an impressive debut; I’m be looking forward to the second book in the Drowning Empire Trilogy.

The Blog Tour

Please buy from independents if you can XX

#BlogTour for #TheHeights by @Parker_Bilal @blackthornbks @RandomTTours

THE HEIGHTS is the second book in the Crane and Drake series from Parker Bilal. The first book in the series ‘The Divinities’ received great feedback, such as ‘terrific crime fiction rooted in geopolitics’ from the Sunday Times, and ‘told with a delicate elegance . . . it promises to be a fine series’ from the Daily Mail. For book chat about the newly published, THE HEIGHTS, please do keep scrolling. With thanks to the publisher for the review copy, and Anne for the tour invite.

The Blurb:

What starts with the gruesome discovery of a severed head on the Tube soon becomes personal for former DI Cal Drake. After one betrayal too many, Drake has abandoned the police force to become a private detective. He’s teamed up with enigmatic forensic pathologist Dr Rayhana Crane and it’s not long before the case leads them to the darkest corners of the nation’s capital and in dangerously close contact with an international crime circuit, a brutal local rivalry and a very personal quest for retribution. With the murder victim tied to Drake’s past, his new future is about to come under threat.

My thoughts…

This book begins after Cal Drake, a former Met DI, has left the police force, and begun work as a private detective, partnering with Dr. Rayhana Crane, a forensic psychologist. The story begins as this partnership starts to work together, and coinciding with the disturbing discovery of a severed head of a woman on a tube train. The plot develops and draws in Drake’s past during an undercover drugs operation, and a complex web of gangs, drugs, suspicion and plotting develops.

I really enjoyed the plot layers, and you have to keep focused as past and present collide in this well written crime thriller. Added into the mix is a seemingly Middle East connected abduction, that spirals into another connection, bringing both investigations on a similar tangent. The relationship between Drake and Crane adds a further dimension, and although suffers from mistrust, they make an interesting team. Both have layers, and I may have some missing gaps from not reading ‘The Divinities’, the first book in the series, but it didn’t seem to matter. There’s a lot of depth and complex detail in the book, which can slow the pace, but when it picks up it hurtles along!

It’s dark, intense, disturbing and complex. A decent crime thriller read.

The Author

Parker Bilal

Parker Bilal is the pseudonym of Jamal Mahjoub, the critically acclaimed literary novelist. He is the author of the Makana Investigations series, the third of which, The Ghost Runner, was longlisted for the Theakston’s Old Peculiar Crime Novel of the Year Award. The Divinities, the first in his Crane and Drake London crime series, was published in 2019. Born in London, he has lived in a number of places, including the UK, Denmark, Spain and, currently, the Netherlands.


@Parker_Bilal | jamalmahjoub.com

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Delighted to be on the #BlogTour today for #TheYearOfTheWitching by @alexhwrites @penguinrandom @RandomTTours

I love a good yarn about witchcraft, so jumped at the chance to be a part of the blog tour for THE YEAR OF THE WITCHING, huge thanks to Anne for the invite. It’s a debut novel from Alexis Henderson whose lifelong love of ghost stories and all things witchcraft has resulted in a surprisingly detailed story, with complex themes and a defiant, political feminist drive.

Please keep scrolling for bookish chat about THE YEAR OF THE WITCHING

Four witches. Four warnings. Four plagues, and the first had come upon them…

The blurb:

Born on the fringes of Bethel, Immanuelle does her best to obey the Church and follow Holy Protocol. For it was in Bethel that the first Prophet pursued and killed four powerful witches, and so cleansed the land.
And then a chance encounter lures her into the Darkwood that surrounds Bethel.
It is a forbidden place, haunted by the spirits of the witches who bestow an extraordinary gift on Immanuelle. The diary of her dead mother . . .
Fascinated by and fearful of the secrets the diary reveals, Immanuelle begins to understand why her mother once consorted with witches. And as the truth about the Prophets, the Church and their history is revealed, so Immanuelle understands what must be done. For the real threat to Bethel is its own darkness.
Bethel must change. And that change will begin with her . . .

My thoughts…

Firstly, this is not simply a story of witchcraft, it’s a layered and detailed novel with Atwood vibes connecting the wider themes into the dominant patriarchal village of Bethal. I must admit I wasn’t expecting a YA book vibe, so once that was established, I was able to adjust to the overall plot, character types and their relationships.

Bethal is controlled strongly by religion, and the patriarchy that represents it. The rules over the villagers are stark, particularly so for the women. The darkness and the evil are not, as expected, ultimately caused by the witches, but it’s deeply rooted in the societal structures in place throughout Bethal. At the centre of this is the Prophet, who leads the villagers and is the top of the village’s hierarchy – he is also able to claim several wives, and both dominate and control them to his advantage. The reader cannot help but immediately question the morality and systemic patriarchy controlling this sheltered and alienated village.

So, where’s the witchcraft? It lies in the deep forest surrounding the town, and in its history. Our eyes are opened to this, through our central protagonist, Immanuelle, whose life changes after finding her dead mother’s diary; suddenly her perspective of the world shifts, and she begins to question how evil, and how much a threat the spirits of the witches in the wood are.

This is also a book about a quest, and the coming of age story of Immanuelle. She is drawn into the battle to stop four plagues descending on the village, a plague she unwittingly began. Her quest is to defeat the four plagues of Blood, Blight, Darkness and Slaughter, and along the way discover who is she, and where she truly belongs. Her bravery, passion, and morality to do what is right makes her a powerful female character; this is most definitely, and rightly, her story.

Certainly, a strong debut novel, with surprising thematic depth. A book that explores religion, patriarchy, feminism, fundamentalism, and politics as a young girl fights for the truth of her past and attempts to build a better future. With an abundance of darkness, witchery, and horror; this is a steadily paced and detailed book of a town plagued by witchcraft with a powerful thematic undercurrent.

The Author

Alexis Henderson is a speculative fiction writer with a penchant for dark fantasy, witchcraft, and cosmic horror. She grew up in one of America’s most haunted cities, Savannah, Georgia, which instilled in her a life-long love of ghost stories. When she doesn’t have her nose buried in a book, you can find her painting or watching horror movies with her feline familiar. Currently, Alexis resides in the sun-soaked marshland of Charleston, South Carolina.

Alexis Henderson

The Blog Tour

Please do check out more bookish chat about THE YEAR OF THE WITCHING from these brilliant bloggers.

Please do buy from independents if you can XX

Pleased to be a part of the #BlogTour for #Innocent by @KinsleyErin @headlinepg @RandomTTours

I’m very excited and grateful to be a part of the Blog Tour for Erin Kinsley’s Innocent – many thanks to Anne for the invite and Headline for sending the book. I love a good thriller with a large dose of drama, and this was billed as great for people who enjoyed LIAR and BROADCHURCH. As soon as I started reading, I could see this as a TV drama, and please do keep reading to find out why…

A MURDER TEARS A SMALL TOWN APART. BUT WHO DID IT?

The pretty market town of Sterndale is a close-knit community where everyone thinks they know everyone else. But at a lavish summer wedding a local celebrity is discovered slumped in the gardens, the victim of a violent assault that leads to a murder investigation.

As the police search for answers, suspicion and paranoia build – and the lives of the locals are turned upside down.

Secrets that lurk beneath the pristine façade of Sterndale come to light as detectives close in on the truth…

Please do check out these other brilliant book bloggers for more bookish chat about ‘Innocent’

My thoughts…

This book from the start was so easy to visualise as a TV series, I could picture the mix of close and long shots, and the switches in perspectives, as all the central players come into focus. In all good thrillers, you need a great location and great diverse characters, and Innocent provides all of this in abundance. I really enjoyed it.

The book is set in the small town of Sterndale, and begins with a brutal assault of a celebrity, Tristan Hart, who lives in the town with his wife, Izzy and their young daughter. This novel certainly begins with ‘the calm before the storm’, as the perfect couple leading a perfect life, fractures within the opening pages and is pulled apart over the course of the novel. Secrets, lies and betrayals take centre stage as the reader is tasked with working out what’s behind the surface and who could possibly have acted so violently.

From the start, there are plenty of suspects to choose from, and this only builds as the investigation progresses. I enjoyed the Police investigation perspective as those who knew Tristan Hart are investigated, and secrets are revealed. The investigation and interviews are written in detail, and sometimes repeated back, some may find this a repetitious, but I enjoyed the reflection time to wonder about the suspects.

This is not a fast-paced book, it takes its time to describe this community and the events that shake it up, I enjoyed taking my time reading it as well, and loved the heart behind the story. I enjoyed the tensions, the reveals and the emotional depth within this thriller. With some smart red herrings to put you off the scent, there’s some super plotting in this book that makes you want to keep reading.

A emotionally charged, intelligently designed thriller that demands you keep turning the pages. Highly recommended.

Please buy from Independents if you can XX

I’m delighted to be a part of the #blogtour for #Mime by @ChrisseyWrites with thanks to Anne @RandomTTours #readers #newbook #bookchat

I’m quite an eclectic reader, so when I was asked to join the blog tour for ‘Mime’, I jumped at the opportunity to read a genre that’s not my typical choice. In all honesty, it was not a book I’d probably pick up if I saw it in a bookstore, mainly because the cover doesn’t appeal to me personally (because I’m not a supernatural/horror reader), but I’m really glad I got to read this. Keep scrolling to find out why…

Blurb

There’s a supernatural killer on the loose…

Elliot Cross didn’t believe in monsters. At least, not until his brother died at the hands of something unnatural.

Four years later and a string of impossible deaths leave the police baffled. Consumed by a desire to shine a journalistic light on the supernatural world, Elliot sees a chance to make a difference. Enlisting the help of his (only) employee, Samantha, he quickly identifies the culprit – a demonic mime artist whose invisible creations are fatally real.

Way out of his depth, Elliot’s only hope is renowned demon hunter Gabriel Cushing. But tracking down Gabriel is only the beginning… The search for a way to end the demon forever will take Elliot and Sam across the country, uncovering lost history, buried secrets, and a few new truths about themselves.

My thoughts

Mime is one of those books that’s pure escapism, and fun to read. It’s on the long side, coming in at 520 pages, but don’t let that put you off! It’s an adventure from start to finish, and I relaxed straight away into Harrison’s clear and uncomplicated storytelling. I’ve always loved being told stories since I was little, and this is one of those books you can just sink into. It’s described as a supernatural thriller, and it certainly is that, however you also get a flawed and haunted lead character, Elliot Cross, whose investigation into the strange and weird wraps the reader very quickly into a battle with a supernatural demon nemesis. Along the way, he enlists support from other like-minded people, and suddenly we have a varied demon fighting team, but it’s certainly a battle to stay alive.

Cross’s main sidekick is Sam, and she becomes more than an employee as the story develops, this adds a side romance plot, but it doesn’t overtake at all. The focus remains on the battle to remove Mime from its host and stop it murdering innocents. There’s a hidden past to uncover, as the team race across the country to find a way to exorcise the demon that is after them, and one of the secrets has deeply personal implications. This adds needed depth, and is plotted in extremely well.

If you like supernatural reads, than I’d highly recommend ‘Mime’. A driven mystery, a supernatural thriller, an evil demon in a battle with flawed, but driven, dedicated demon hunters and a fun adventure. I really enjoyed the variety of the cast of characters, and as we discover more about them, they also realise there’s so much more going on under the surface. The story sets itself up really well for the sequel.

A thrilling supernatural adventure with heart! Recommended Read.

The Author

Chrissey Harrison

Author of supernatural thrillers and other spec genre fiction.

Subscribe to my newsletter for free bonus content: https://bit.ly/3d3ar0k

What can you expect from my books? Monsters, magic, action and adventure, and fragile human characters trying to muddle through as best they can. They make mistakes and bad choices sometimes, and they have to learn to recognise their own strengths and weaknesses and turn to their friends and loved ones for help and support.

My debut novel, “Mime”, released June 2020. Working on this book has been an epic 10 year journey learning how to be a writer. Although Mime was my first project, it has routinely been on the back burner while I worked on other projects. You can discover the published ones in the books section of my website, and novelette “The Star Coin Prophecy” is available as a free download for subscribers.

FIND ME:
Website: http://chrisseyharrison.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/chrisseywrites
Facebook: http://facebook.com/authorchrisseyharrison

I’m a science geek, gamer, fan of sci-fi and fantasy, and wearer of many hats. Metaphorical hats, that is, not so much real hats. At the moment I mostly wear my writer hat, my designer and my crafter hat. I also used to wear my film maker hat when producing movies with my amazing colleagues over at The Great Escape.

I live in Clevedon in a creaky old Victorian terrace with my partner and my 17 year-old goldfish Ambition. One day I will own a cat… one day.

Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mime-Supernatural-Thriller-Chrissey-Harrison/dp/1838593608

Check out the other blog tour chat for ‘Mime’

2020 Blog Tour Dates for MIME

Pleased to be joining the #blogtour for #TheOneThatGotAway by @Egan_Hughes #compulsivereaders @Tr4cyF3nt0n #newbook #readers with thanks to @BooksSphere

You love him. You trust him. You can’t escape him.

The blurb

Mia thinks she has escaped her controlling ex-husband, Rob. She’s found herself a new home, a new boyfriend and a new life.

But when the police arrive to tell her that Rob has been found dead on his boat, things quickly fall apart. Mia is terrified she’ll be suspected, however the police are keeping all options open. They know Mia had reason to hate her ex-husband, but she’s not the only one. Plenty of people wanted Rob Creavy dead, not least his new wife, Rachel.

What they don’t know is that Mia has a secret, one she’s desperate to protect.

But someone else knows. Someone with very dark secrets of their own . . .

My thoughts

‘The One That Got Away’ is a tense thriller built on lies, abuse, manipulation, jealousy and deceit that ends with murder. The story is told in different time frames via our frame narrator, so it’s really enjoyable piecing everything together. One of the things I enjoyed about this story is controlled plotting of the narrative, and the insight into gaslighting behaviour.

The story begins with a death, and the reader finds themselves questioning what really happened, as we find out more about Mia, her current life and her past as Jess. In the present day, Mia is dealing with the aftermath of her ex-husband’s murder, and its implications on her current life. This story is split up with the experience of Jess, as she falls in love, gets married and finds her life becomes anything but happy.

This book is a strong debut, for me personally it stalled a little in the middle, and I wanted the narrative to develop at a quicker pace, but that’s just my experience. The narrative drive comes from the question, why now? why does this murder happen at this particular time and who are the suspects? I enjoyed how little clues and red herrings were implanted carefully into the story.

Overall, a solid psychological thriller debut. Huge thanks to the author, and publisher for the review copy.

Please buy from independents if you can XX

#BlogTour #WritteninBlood by Chris Carter @simonschusterUK @harriett_col #RandomThingsTours

So happy to be a part of the Blog Tour for WRITTEN IN BLOOD – if you’re not aware, this is the 11th book in Chris Carter’s Robert Hunter thriller series, and… there’s a serial killer to catch. With huge thanks to Anne for the tour invite, and do keep scrolling for some bookish chat…

The Blurb

A serial killer will stop at nothing…


The Killer
His most valuable possession has been stolen.
Now he must retrieve it, at any cost.
The Girl
Angela Wood wanted to teach the man a lesson. It was a
bag, just like all the others. But when she opens it, the
worst nightmare of her life begins.
The Detective
A journal ends up at Robert Hunter’s desk. It soon
becomes clear that there is a serial killer on the loose.
And if he can’t stop him in time, more people will die.


If you have read it
You must die

My thoughts

I first met Robert Hunter in ‘The Crucifix Killer’ and have really enjoyed this series – if you are a new reader, then don’t worry, each works as a stand-a-lone. In this case, Hunter is pitted against a serial killer, who comes to the attention of the Ultra Violent Crimes Unit, via the theft of a journal. This brings both the thief and Hunter to the attention of the journal’s author and the game begins. It soon becomes clear that there has been a serial killer in circulation for a considerable time, and this person is truly a ‘professional’ and needs to be caught.

What I really enjoy about Carter’s books, and very much this one, is the ease of the story telling; you know you are in safe hands, as Carter crafts the plots, red-herrings, tensions, characters and reveals with such control and dexterity. I loved the puzzle narrative via the journal, as we slowly learn from the killer’s words about the victims, their lives, and begin to work out what’s behind the inconsistencies in the patterns.

Hunter is smart, and like his name he sets his sights on his prey and is relentless; this also comes with high personal costs. There’s a great balance between Hunter and his partner Garcia, and they make a great team. In addition, we have small-time thief Angela, who becomes caught in the killer’s sights and needs protecting; I really enjoyed her story, and how this added emotional depth to the overall crime thriller.

This is a dark book, that looks into the mind of a controlled and incredibly dangerous psychopath. Thoroughly enjoyable, and it’s a highly recommended read.

The Author

Chris Carter

Born in Brazil of Italian origin, Chris Carter studied psychology and criminal behaviour at the University of Michigan. As a member of the Michigan State District Attorney’s Criminal Psychology team, he interviewed and studied many criminals, including serial and multiple homicide offenders with life imprisonment convictions. He now lives in London.
Visit his website http://www.chriscarterbooks.com

BLOG TOUR DATES

Please buy from INDEPENDENT BOOKSELLERS if you can XX

#blogtour for #HintonHollowDeathTrip by @will_carver #DSPace @OrendaBooks @annecater

I’m delighted to be on the blog tour today for HINTON HOLLOW DEATH TRIP by Will Carver and published by the fabulous Orenda Books, with thanks to Karen, and to Anne for the tour invite. This is my first time reading one of Will Carver’s books, and it seems I’ve been missing out! Please keep scrolling for some bookish chat about the addictive, disturbing and unsettling world of Hinton Hollow… be brave, take the trip!

In this small town, nobody is innocent…

The Blurb

It’s a small story. A small town with small lives that you would never have heard about if none of this had happened.

Hinton Hollow. Population 5,120.
Little Henry Wallace was eight years old and one hundred miles from home
before anyone talked to him. His mother placed him on a train with a label
around his neck, asking for him to be kept safe for a week, kept away from
Hinton Hollow.
Because something was coming.
Narrated by Evil itself, Hinton Hollow Death Trip recounts five days in the
history of this small rural town, when darkness paid a visit and infected its
residents. A visit that made them act in unnatural ways. Prodding at their
insecurities. Nudging at their secrets and desires. Coaxing out the malevolence suppressed within them. Showing their true selves.
Making them cheat.
Making them steal.
Making them kill.Detective Sergeant Pace had returned to his childhood home. To escape the things he had done in the city. To go back to something simple. But he was not alone.

Evil had a plan.

My thoughts…

This is the third book featuring Detective Sergeant Pace, now admittedly I’ve not read either of the first two books (Good Samaritans or Nothing Important Happened Today) however, it really didn’t matter, as DS Pace is not the central character or the main narrator of the story; it is actually, Evil. Yes, Evil is our narrative voice, and that’s the creative and unusual second person narrative that begins the book. By directly calling out to the reader pulls you into the story in quite a personal way, and it also comes with a readers’ warning – ‘you can leave now, if you want… this is the last time I try to save you’. The brave, or inquisitive reader will of course continue, how could you not after that… and soon we are passing the crossroads and entering the world of Hinton Hollow, and how it becomes a living hell once Evil begins to play and manipulate its inhabitants.

I loved the creativity and drama of the story-telling – my goodness, it’s a struggle to put the book down. Crazy, as it’s creepy; it’s also disturbing, repulsive and traumatic. Be warned, children die, animals are tortured and killed, people are manipulated into the darkest of deeds, and overlapping all this is a stark message about human nature.

The structure is rather Brecht-like as the narrative is constructed to pull on our own consciousness. The book is split over a serious of days, with headers to summarise what you will learn. There are several other headers breaking down the story into units of focus; I really enjoyed the creativity of this. The reader is asked to reflect, consider, and evaluate as our narrator bombards us with signs and scenes; we have no choice but to question humanity and the essence of who we are.

Hinton Hollow questions what is ordinary? More importantly, what lies behind the ordinary. It’s a dark book and stalks the reader like a predator. You begin to question everything you think you know, as you fight through an often depressive bombardment of statements about humanity: its perversions, its vacuous selfish people and the detached predator lurking inside in our inconsistencies, ironies and collective consciousness.

This book is written with confidence, control and a significant level of darkness. Capricious in nature, and disturbing in tone this is a creative read, but definitely not for the sensitive or easily triggered reader. However, in all of the darkness there’s a shining ray of hope on day six, where we take a moment to think about our connection to time, to needing more time, for waiting; it’s blatantly clear the message is to stop. To stop delaying, trying to please, wasting time and try changing… and to be a good person. I loved this lift to the heavily, emotionally bleak world of this book. It has that Inspector Goole vibe, of the collective consciousness and responsibility to each other and ourselves. We actually question the notion of evil, and the puppet master controlling Hinton Hollow.

Far from your typical crime mystery novel, Hinton Hollow Death Trip pushes at the boundaries and then pushes at your consciousness – Will Carver’s head must be a full-on place to be! Bold, creative, absorbing and complex writing that hooks you in with a mighty grip. Be brave. Read it.

The Author

Will Carver

Will Carver is the international bestselling author of the January David series.
He spent his early years in Germany, but returned to the UK at age eleven,
when his sporting career took off. He turned down a professional rugby
contract to study theatre and television at King Alfred’s, Winchester, where he set up a successful theatre company. He currently runs his own fitness and nutrition company, and lives in Reading with his two children. Good Samaritans was book of the year in Guardian, Telegraph and Daily Express, and hit number one on the ebook charts.

Blog Tour

#blogtour #TheSeduction @JoannaBriscoe @BloomsburyBooks #RandomThingsTours @AnneCater #readers #bookchat #newbook

Hugely excited to be a part of this blog tour, and many thanks to Anne Cater for the tour invite! I haven’t read any Joanna Briscoe books, so it’s lovely to be introduced to a new writer with a backlog of books to discover. Keep reading to find out more about ‘The Seduction’.

The Blurb

Beth lives in the tree-shrouded no-man’s land by Camden with her partner Sol and their daughter Fern. Life is peaceful, but Beth is troubled by increasing unease. It could be the uncertainty of her mother, who disappeared when Beth was a child. Or it could be the sense that Fern is keeping secrets from her.

So she goes to therapy. Dr Tamara Bywater is there to help her patients. But what if the very person who is meant to be the solution becomes the most dangerous problem of all? And why is what’s bad for us so enticing?

My thoughts

It’s certainly true that this book embraces the beauty and flexibility of language in its descriptions. I was hooked in early; the narrative weaves its spell and pulls you into the lives of Beth, Fern and Sol, as Beth’s troubled past brings her to the attention of Dr Tamara Bywater. There follows a story of obsession, manipulation and the power of paranoia.

What I enjoyed about this book is its study of human behaviour and the dark undertone in the writing, it’s certainly an addictive concept. I also enjoyed the theme of mother-daughter relationships, which lie at the core of this novel. What makes this book more than a relationship drama, is how it explores the role of the therapist; a person who is privy to your inner thoughts and, who has the ability to manipulate that closeness if they choose to do so. That’s where this novel’s tone is more disturbing as slowly Beth’s relationship with Dr Bywater becomes sexually charged, and draws her into a complex situation to the detriment of her family life.

Overall, a beautifully crafted, darkly drawn story of human psychology and dysfunctional personalities, colliding in a toxic and emotional journey of a book.

The Blog Tour

The Author

Joanna Briscoe

Joanna Briscoe is the author of five previous novels, including the bestselling Sleep With Me, which was adapted for ITV by Andrew Davies. She has been a columnist for the Independent and the Guardian, is a literary critic for the Guardian, and broadcasts regularly on Radio 4.

joannabriscoe.com
@JoannaBriscoe